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HYPERBARIC OXYGEN THERAPY

Hyperbaric Oxygen Therapy (HBOT) is approved by the FDA to treat many medical conditions. HBOT increases the amount of oxygen your blood can carry. An increase in blood oxygen may restore normal levels of blood gases and tissue function to promote healing and fight infection.

Under normal circumstances, oxygen is transported throughout the body only by red blood cells. With HBOT, oxygen is dissolved into all of the body's fluids, the plasma, the central nervous system fluids, the lymph, and the bone and can be carried to areas where circulation is diminished or blocked. In this way, extra oxygen can reach all of the damaged tissues and the body can support its own healing process. The increased oxygen greatly enhances the ability of white blood cells to kill bacteria, reduce swelling and allow new blood vessels to grow more rapidly into the affected areas. It is a simple, non-invasive, and painless treatment.

Hyperbaric Oxygen Therapy may improve the quality of life of patients in many areas and can be used to enhance standard medical treatments. Many conditions such as stroke, cerebral palsy, head injuries, and chronic fatigue have responded favorably to HBOT.

  • Reduces Inflammation

  • Increases Stem Cell Production

  • Promotes Angiogenesis

  • Increases Mental Clarity & Alertness

  • Strengthens Immune System

  • Heightens Energy & Performance

  • Increases Healing of Injuries & Wounds

  • Decreases Bruising

  • Anti-Aging

Always seek the advice of a physician or other qualified health provider with any questions you may have regarding a medical condition. Never disregard professional medical advice or delay in seeking.

 

WHAT TO EXPECT

Once the treatment begins, you will hear a hissing sound as the chamber pressurizes. You may also notice a temporary increase in temperature during this compression. A staff member will remain with you to adjust the rate of compression according to your tolerance and coach you on relieving the full sensation in your ears. Once you are at the prescribed pressure in the chamber, your ear pressure sensation will go away. You should feel absolutely normal at this time.

You may sleep, or just rest during your treatment, which usually lasts one – one an half hours. Generally, you experience no after effects from HBOT therapy. However, some patients report a crackling sensation in their ears between treatments. This may be relieved in the same manner as clearing your ears during compression. If the crackling should continue, please report this to the hyperbaric staff. Additionally, some patients report feeling light headed for a few moments following treatment, but the episode is brief and the patients are soon able to continue with their normal daily activity.

Things that are not permitted inside the chamber include:

  • No lotions, makeup, deodorant, hairspray

  • No fresh nail polish or acrylic nails

  • No cell phones or reading materials

  • Electronic devices

  • Glasses and hard contact lenses

  • Watches, Jewelry

  • Matches and lighters

Keep hydrated after your HBOT appointment and follow any other instructions given to you by our hyperbaric operator.

Contact us immediately if you are feeling unwell after treatment.

 

HISTORY BEHIND HBOT

Increased pressure allows for oxygen to dissolve and saturate the blood plasma (independent of hemoglobin/red blood cells), which yields a broad variety of positive physiological, biochemical and cellular effects. This noninvasive therapy is the most trusted way to increase oxygen levels to all organs of the body.

Hyperbaric Oxygen Therapy (HBOT) is a medical treatment that can be traced back to the 1600’s. In 1662, the first renowned chamber was built and operated by a British clergyman named Henshaw. He erected a structure titled, the Domicilium, that was used to treat a variety of conditions. In 1878, Paul Bert, a French physiologist, discovered the link between decompression sickness and nitrogen bubbles. Bert later identified that the pain could be ameliorated with recompression. The concept of treating patients under pressurized conditions was continued by the French surgeon Fontaine, who later built a pressurized mobile operating room in 1879. Fontaine found that inhaled nitrous oxide had a greater potency under pressure, in addition to his patients having improved oxygenation.

In the early 1900’s Dr. Orville Cunningham, a professor of anesthesia, observed that people with particular heart diseases improved better when they lived closer to sea level than those living at higher altitudes. He treated a colleague who was suffering from influenza and was near death due to lung restriction. His resounding success led him to develop what was known as the “Steel Ball Hospital” located along the shore of Lake Erie. The six story structure was erected in 1928 and was 64 feet in diameter. The hospital could reach 3 atmospheres absolute. Unfortunately, due to the depressed financial status of the economy, it was deconstructed during in 1942 for scrap.

Subsequently, hyperbaric chambers were later developed by the military in the 1940’s to treat deep-sea divers who suffered from decompression sickness. In the 1950’s, physicians first employed HBOT during heart and lung surgery, which led to its use for carbon monoxide poisoning in the 1960’s. Since then, over 10,000 clinical trials and case studies have been completed for numerous other health-related applications with the vast majority of results reporting resounding success

 
 
 

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